December 20th, 2014

Happy Holidays!

Bitter cold mornings?

Check.

Changed your the sheets on your bed to flannel?

Check.

Leaves almost completely fallen off the trees and into messy piles of muck?

Check.

Preparing yourself for winter? Oven is being turned on more often?

Check. And check.

Me too. This recipe is for a quickbread from my book. It’s one of those recipes that sort of sneaked up on me, visit and weaseled its way into my culinary lexicon– one that I find myself baking time and again. Maybe its because it’s dead simple, or perhaps it’s because I usually have all of the ingredients in my pantry, or maybe it’s because it is just delicious!

VermontGrahamBread1This bread is made with Graham flour– a flour that was new to me. I was familiar with Graham crackers (adorned with peanut butter– sign me up!), but I had never baked with the flour. Graham flour is one of those old-fashioned, regional New England flours from the 19th century. Created by Sylvester Graham, a preacher and one of the countries first health nuts, this flour is similar to whole wheat, but it grinds the entire wheat berry at coarser levels. The result is a rich, nutty, and slightly sweet flour.

This recipe hales from Vermont and uses a bit of pure maple syrup. With just a hint of brown sugar, and raisins– for added sweetness and chewiness, it’s dark and sustaining. This is a humble bread, but once released from the pan, and set to cool on a rack, I find myself returning to the kitchen and slicing off piece after thin piece and slathering it with salted butter. It’s one of those simple yet superb recipes, and a very good reason to turn on the oven!

VermontGrahamBread2Vermont Graham Bread
from United States of Bread

Makes 1 loaf

1 1/2 cups (7 1/2 ounces) graham flour
1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup (2 ounces) brown sugar
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup (21/2 ounces) raisins

Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter, or lightly coat a standard loaf pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk the flours, baking soda, nutmeg, and salt together. Set aside. In another medium-size bowl, whisk the brown sugar, maple syrup, egg, and buttermilk together until well blended. All at once, add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. Fold in the raisins.

Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan, smoothing the top. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the bread is lightly browned, and a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold. Bread can be sliced and eaten while still warm.

Note:
Graham flour can be found in health food stores, and some grocery stores. Bob’s Red Mill, as well as Hodgson Mills make great graham flour. If you are having trouble finding it, you can substitute whole wheat flour, though the bread will not have the same nuttiness, or flavor.
Bitter cold mornings?

Check.

Changed your sheets to flannel?

Check.

Leaves almost completely fallen into messy piles of muck?

Check.

Preparing yourself for winter? Oven is being turned on more often?

Check. And check.

Me too. This recipe is a quickbread from my book, help and it’s one that kind of surprised me. It’s one of those recipes that sort sneaked up on me, medicine and weaseled its way into my culinary lexicon. Maybe its because its dead simple, or perhaps it’s because I usually have all of the ingredients in my pantry, or maybe it’s because it is just delicious!

VermontGrahamBread1Graham flour is one of those old-fashioned, regional flours from the 19th century that I discovered while writing the book, and now use all of the time. Created by Sylvester Graham a preacher and one of the countries first health nuts, this flour is similar to whole wheat, but it grinds the entire wheat berry at coarser levels. The result is a rich, nutty, and slightly sweet flour.

This recipe uses a bit of pure maple syrup, with just a hint of brown sugar, and raisins– for added sweetness and chewiness. Dark and sustaining, this is a humble bread, but once released from the pan, and set to cool on a rack, I find myself returning to the kitchen and slicing off piece after thin piece and slathering it with salted butter.

VermontGrahamBread2Vermont Graham Bread
from United States of Bread

Makes 1 loaf

1 1/2 cups (7 1/2 ounces) graham flour
1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup (2 ounces) brown sugar
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup (21/2 ounces) raisins

Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter, or lightly coat a standard loaf pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk the flours, baking soda, nutmeg, and salt together. Set aside. In another medium-size bowl, whisk the brown sugar, maple syrup, egg, and buttermilk together until well blended. All at once, add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. Fold in the raisins.

Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan, smoothing the top. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the bread is lightly browned, and a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold. Bread can be sliced and eaten while still warm.

Note:
Graham flour can be found in health food stores, and some grocery stores. Bob’s Red Mill, as well as Hodgson Mills make great graham flour. If you are having trouble finding it, you can substitute whole wheat flour, though the bread will not have the same nuttiness, or flavor.
Bitter cold mornings?

Check.

Changed your the sheets on your bed  to flannel?

Check.

Leaves almost completely fallen off the treed and into messy piles of muck?

Check.

Preparing yourself for winter? Oven is being turned on more often?

Check. And check.

Me too. This recipe is a quickbread from my book, sildenafil and it’s one that kind of surprised me. It’s one of those recipes that sort of sneaked up on me, medicine and weaseled its way into my culinary lexicon, one that I find myself baking time and again. Maybe its because its dead simple, or perhaps it’s because I usually have all of the ingredients in my pantry, or maybe it’s because it is just delicious!

VermontGrahamBread1This bread is made with Graham flour– a flour that was new to me. I was familiar with Graham crackers (with peanut butter– sign me up!), but I had never baked with the flour. Graham flour is one of those old-fashioned, regional flours from the 19th century. Created by Sylvester Graham a preacher and one of the countries first health nuts, this flour is similar to whole wheat, but it grinds the entire wheat berry at coarser levels. The result is a rich, nutty, and slightly sweet flour.

This recipe hales from Vermont and uses a bit of pure maple syrup. With just a hint of brown sugar, and raisins– for added sweetness and chewiness, it’s dark and sustaining. This is a humble bread, but once released from the pan, and set to cool on a rack, I find myself returning to the kitchen and slicing off piece after thin piece and slathering it with salted butter. It’s one of those simple yet superb recipes, and a very good reason to turn on the oven!

VermontGrahamBread2Vermont Graham Bread
from United States of Bread

Makes 1 loaf

1 1/2 cups (7 1/2 ounces) graham flour
1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup (2 ounces) brown sugar
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup (21/2 ounces) raisins

Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter, or lightly coat a standard loaf pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk the flours, baking soda, nutmeg, and salt together. Set aside. In another medium-size bowl, whisk the brown sugar, maple syrup, egg, and buttermilk together until well blended. All at once, add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. Fold in the raisins.

Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan, smoothing the top. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the bread is lightly browned, and a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold. Bread can be sliced and eaten while still warm.

Note:
Graham flour can be found in health food stores, and some grocery stores. Bob’s Red Mill, as well as Hodgson Mills make great graham flour. If you are having trouble finding it, you can substitute whole wheat flour, though the bread will not have the same nuttiness, or flavor.
Bitter cold mornings?

Check.

Changed your the sheets on your bed  to flannel?

Check.

Leaves almost completely fallen off the treed and into messy piles of muck?

Check.

Preparing yourself for winter? Oven is being turned on more often?

Check. And check.

Me too. This recipe is a quickbread from my book, cost and it’s one that kind of surprised me. It’s one of those recipes that sort of sneaked up on me, buy and weaseled its way into my culinary lexicon, pill one that I find myself baking time and again. Maybe its because its dead simple, or perhaps it’s because I usually have all of the ingredients in my pantry, or maybe it’s because it is just delicious!

VermontGrahamBread1This bread is made with Graham flour– a flour that was new to me. I was familiar with Graham crackers (with peanut butter– sign me up!), but I had never baked with the flour. Graham flour is one of those old-fashioned, regional flours from the 19th century. Created by Sylvester Graham a preacher and one of the countries first health nuts, this flour is similar to whole wheat, but it grinds the entire wheat berry at coarser levels. The result is a rich, nutty, and slightly sweet flour.

This recipe hales from Vermont and uses a bit of pure maple syrup. With just a hint of brown sugar, and raisins– for added sweetness and chewiness, it’s dark and sustaining. This is a humble bread, but once released from the pan, and set to cool on a rack, I find myself returning to the kitchen and slicing off piece after thin piece and slathering it with salted butter. It’s one of those simple yet superb recipes, and a very good reason to turn on the oven!

VermontGrahamBread2Vermont Graham Bread
from United States of Bread

Makes 1 loaf

1 1/2 cups (7 1/2 ounces) graham flour
1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup (2 ounces) brown sugar
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup (21/2 ounces) raisins

Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter, or lightly coat a standard loaf pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk the flours, baking soda, nutmeg, and salt together. Set aside. In another medium-size bowl, whisk the brown sugar, maple syrup, egg, and buttermilk together until well blended. All at once, add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. Fold in the raisins.

Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan, smoothing the top. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the bread is lightly browned, and a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold. Bread can be sliced and eaten while still warm.

Note:
Graham flour can be found in health food stores, and some grocery stores. Bob’s Red Mill, as well as Hodgson Mills make great graham flour. If you are having trouble finding it, you can substitute whole wheat flour, though the bread will not have the same nuttiness, or flavor.
Bitter cold mornings?

Check.

Changed your the sheets on your bed to flannel?

Check.

Leaves almost completely fallen off the trees and into messy piles of muck?

Check.

Preparing yourself for winter? Oven is being turned on more often?

Check. And check.

Me too. This recipe is for a quickbread from my book. It’s one of those recipes that sort of sneaked up on me, viagra and weaseled its way into my culinary lexicon– one that I find myself baking time and again. Maybe its because it’s dead simple, illness or perhaps it’s because I usually have all of the ingredients in my pantry, or maybe it’s because it is just delicious!

VermontGrahamBread1This bread is made with Graham flour– a flour that was new to me. I was familiar with Graham crackers (adorned with peanut butter– sign me up!), but I had never baked with the flour. Graham flour is one of those old-fashioned, regional New England flours from the 19th century. Created by Sylvester Graham, a preacher and one of the countries first health nuts, this flour is similar to whole wheat, but it grinds the entire wheat berry at coarser levels. The result is a rich, nutty, and slightly sweet flour.

This recipe hales from Vermont and uses a bit of pure maple syrup. With just a hint of brown sugar, and raisins– for added sweetness and chewiness, it’s dark and sustaining. This is a humble bread, but once released from the pan, and set to cool on a rack, I find myself returning to the kitchen and slicing off piece after thin piece and slathering it with salted butter. It’s one of those simple yet superb recipes, and a very good reason to turn on the oven!

VermontGrahamBread2Vermont Graham Bread
from United States of Bread

Makes 1 loaf

1 1/2 cups (7 1/2 ounces) graham flour
1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup (2 ounces) brown sugar
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup (21/2 ounces) raisins

Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter, or lightly coat a standard loaf pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk the flours, baking soda, nutmeg, and salt together. Set aside. In another medium-size bowl, whisk the brown sugar, maple syrup, egg, and buttermilk together until well blended. All at once, add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. Fold in the raisins.

Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan, smoothing the top. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the bread is lightly browned, and a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold. Bread can be sliced and eaten while still warm.

Note:
Graham flour can be found in health food stores, and some grocery stores. Bob’s Red Mill, as well as Hodgson Mills make great graham flour. If you are having trouble finding it, you can substitute whole wheat flour, though the bread will not have the same nuttiness, or flavor.
The holidays are almost here! Each year I say this, page but it is true– I can hardly believe it!

So I never do the gift guides, medicine or even the yearly round ups, symptoms but this year I’ll leave you with this, my favorite Christmas song. My dad loved the Little Drummer Boy. It didn’t matter that we were Jewish, come December he would be puffing ba-rump-a-bump-bumps under his breath all month long. I’m pretty sure he loved the Johnny Mathis version, but if you ask me, Bing and Bowie do a marvelous mash-up.

Have a great holiday everyone, see you next year!

2 Responses to “Happy Holidays!”

    Anybody who knew about this video and posted it for Christmas has to be a great person with great taste!

    Happy Holidays and I hope someone cleans up for you!

    Lore

  1. --Lore


  2. David Bowie Christmas is the right kinda Christmas! I love this song even when it is not in season!

  3. --John

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